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Science@NASA Headline News

You may have noticed that the "look and feel" of Science@NASA stories has changed. There's no cause for alarm. Our core product, simply- and clearly-told stories about NASA science, remains the same. The changes are a sign of progress. Recently, the Science@NASA team joined forces with the Science Mission Directorate at NASA headquarters. Working together, we'll be able to cover a broader range of NASA discoveries and develop "citizen science" opportunities for our readers, while still producing old favorites such as Apollo Chronicles and "looking up" stories about backyard astronomy events. The sky's the limit.

Feedback is welcomed. Submit your suggestions and comments online or send them directly to me at dr.tony.phillips

  • To Bennu and Back

    To Bennu and Back

    Sept. 8, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    NASA is launching a spacecraft to visit an asteroid… and return to tell the tale. OSIRIS-REx is scheduled to blast off from Cape Canaveral on September 8, 2016, on a mission to orbit, map and collect samples from the asteroid Bennu, and return to Earth 7 years later.

  • Sequencing DNA in Space

    Sequencing DNA in Space

    Aug. 29, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    DNA sequencing is used to identify forms of life; to study how different organisms are related and how they evolved; to pinpoint genetic diseases in individuals and to develop pharmaceutical treatments for maladies. It’s even used for crime-fighting. Now, thanks to an experiment just delivered to the International Space Station, it may be possible to do all these things in space.

  • A Spectacular Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter

    A Spectacular Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter

    Aug. 27, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    August 2016 is a special month for backyard astronomy. Why? Because on almost any evening in August you can take a tour of the solar system—no telescope required.

  • Electric Blue Sunsets

    Electric Blue Sunsets

    Aug. 16, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    Just below the Arctic Circle, evening skies are filling with pale blue ripples. They appear just after sunset or just before sunrise and are called noctilucent clouds (NLCs). When viewed from space, the same atmospheric phenomenon is referred to as polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs).

  • Planetary Defense

    Planetary Defense

    July 3, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    Dinosaurs were fearsome creatures. Some had thick scales, sharp teeth, and, in many cases, lightning-fast reflexes. One thing they didn’t have: a planetary defense office.

  • Twinkle, Twinkle, GPS

    Twinkle, Twinkle, GPS

    July 3, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    Radio signals twinkle in much the same way as bright stars appear to do at optical wavelengths. This can have effects on GPS, causing the signals to brighten and fade, and reach Earth at unpredictable times. All of this could degrade the accuracy of GPS positioning.

  • Monitoring Air Quality

    Monitoring Air Quality

    July 3, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    Air quality is a global issue. Currents of air waft gaseous and particulate pollutants from region to region, country to country, and even continent to continent. Emissions from human activities, sunlight, weather, pollution from far away, wildfires, and wind-blown dust can all affect air quality. And it can change from day to day or even hour to hour. Addressing this global issue requires a global effort. And that effort is in the works.

  • One Carbon Metabolism on the Space Station

    One Carbon Metabolism on the Space Station

    May 31, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    For the first time, researchers have identified a genetic marker associated with a spaceflight medical issue. It is in the enzymes associated with the "1 carbon pathway."

  • Red and Golden Planets at Opposition

    Red and Golden Planets at Opposition

    May 18, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    Mars and Saturn are getting together in the constellation Scorpius for back-to-back oppositions in May and June 2016.

  • The 2016 Transit of Mercury

    The 2016 Transit of Mercury

    May 3, 2016

    Science@NASA Headline News — 2016

    On May 9, 2016, they will see a strange spot on the sun--a dark circle moving across the solar disk. This is no ordinary sunspot. It's the planet Mercury, making a rare transit of the sun.