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UVI animated GIF of eclipse shadow

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Watching the moon's shadow

Eclipse may help probe atmosphere

Update: February 27, 1998:We have replaced yesterday's 54-frame animated GIF with a smaller (11-frame, 80K) compilation using just the images where the eclipse shadow was visible (as opposed to everything during the eclipse). The sequence runs from 18:40:27 to 18:53:19 UT.

We have also replaced the larger, full-frame (300x300-pixel) animation with a 200K sequence of the same frames. You can obtain individual frames from the UVI image files at ftp://uvisun.msfc.nasa.gov/pub/nrt/day057/.

Click on the image below for a quick guide to what you are seeing in the images.

In addition, we have putprint copies of UVI images on line. This page provides a single large JPG with the 10 best eclipse shadow images plus a timeline page depicting where they were taken and an annotated image labeling major features.

At right is a GOES-8 geostationary weather satellite picture of the world as the eclipse shadow moved across Central America at 1744 UT; it links to a 300x273, 96-pixel GIF. If you are ambitious and want more the details, click here for a 900x819-pixel, 350K JPG.

Feel free to reuse these images - please credit NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

Return to main UVI eclipse story.


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Author: Dave Dooling
Production Editor: Dr. Tony Phillips
Curator: Bryan Walls
Responsible NASA official: John M. Horack