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Earth Topics

  • Multi-Agency Mission Uses Laser to Measure Winds

    Science@NASA Headline NewsApril 6, 2011

  • September '96: Coldest Month Ever?

    1996April 6, 2011

  • Marshall Spacecraft Eyeballs Lightningfrom Space!

    1996April 6, 2011

  • Pollen Alert!

    2008April 6, 2011

    NASA is teaming up with public health organizations to create a pollen alert system that could help people with maladies ranging from common hay fever to serious heart and lung diseases.

  • How Round is the Sun?

    2008April 6, 2011

    Scientists using NASA's RHESSI spacecraft have measured the roundness of the sun with unprecedented precision, and they find that it is not a perfect sphere. During years of high solar activity the sun develops a thin "cantaloupe skin" that significantly increases its apparent oblateness.

  • A Flash of Insight: LCROSS Mission Update

    2008Sept. 20, 2011

    There are places on The Moonwhere the sun hasn't shined for millions of years, inky-dark places that may harbor a treasure of great value. NASA's is about to light one of them up.

  • Polar Crown Prominences

    2008April 6, 2011

    Japan's Hinode spacecraft is beaming back must-see movies of a spectacular solar phenomenon known as 'polar crown prominences.'

  • The Realm of Earthworms: NASA Gets Down to the Nitty-Gritty

    2008Sept. 20, 2011

    NASA scientists are preparing to launch a "flying tractor" with microwave sensors to explore the nitty-gritty realm beneath your feet.

  • Radical New Lab Fights Disease Using Satellites

    2008April 6, 2011

    A cutting-edge laboratory has opened in Alabama. Its mission: to combat diseases ranging from asthma to malaria to stroke using data from NASA satellites. Space scientists and public health officials are working together to train the doctors of tomorrow in this far-out approach to medicine.

  • Lunar GRAIL

    2008April 6, 2011

    Gravitationally speaking, The Moonis a strange place. Satellites in lunar orbit feel odd, sideways tugs and end up nose down in the moondust. Astronautsstanding in the middle of lunar lava seas weigh more than they do standing on the shore. A new NASA mission named GRAIL aims to map the moon's quirky gravity field and thus pave the way for future exploration.