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Technology Topics

  • Setting Sail for the Stars

    1999April 6, 2011

    Cracking the whip and unfurling gray sails are among new Space Transportationtechniques under discussion at the 1999 Advanced Propulsion Research Workshop.

  • A Wild Ride in Search of Meteors

    1999April 6, 2011

    On April 11, NASA scientists successfully launched a weather balloon designed to capture meteoroids in the stratosphere. Video highlights from the flight include the sunset as seen from 80,000 ft. and eerie gurgling sounds caused by high altitude winds.

  • Three-in-One Furnace Readied for Possible Space Flight

    1999April 6, 2011

    The Universal Multi-Zone Crystallizator is a precision furnace from Hungary which may finally get a chance to fly due to collaboration between scientists at NASA and Hungarian Universities.

  • Ion Propulsion -- 50 Years in the Making

    1999April 6, 2011

    The concept of ion propulsion, currently being demonstrated on the Deep Space 1mission, goes back to the very beginning of NASA and beyond. The path from concept to reality has not been short or direct, but it has been interesting.

  • What next, Leonids?

    1999April 6, 2011

    The Leonids of 1999 provided skywatchers in Europe and the Middle East with a tremendous show of over 1500 Meteorsper hour at the peak. What lies in store for stargazers next year and in the early 21st century? Read what the experts say!

  • NASA Meteor Balloon Rises Again

    1999April 6, 2011

    NASA scientists and ham radio amateurs are teaming up for a weather balloon flight to the stratosphere during the Leonid meteor shower on November 18, 1999. The balloon will transmit a live webcast of the shower from an altitude of 100,000 ft or more, far above any bad weather or obscuring clouds.

  • Leonids Rain in Spain

    1999April 6, 2011

    An outburst of over 1500 Leonid Meteorsper hour dazzled observers in Europe and the Middle East.

  • Scientists grow heart tissue in Bioreactor

    1999April 6, 2011

    MIT scientists use a NASA-developed device in a first step towards tissue engineering. The cell constructs are less than 1/5-inch across, but represent a significant step in developing replacement parts for damaged organs.

  • Leonids Control Center monitors meteor activity

    1999April 6, 2011

    International team will provide meteor counts for satellite operators

  • Spacecraft may fly on "empty"

    1999April 6, 2011

    Using a propulsive tether concept, spacecraft may be able to brake or boost their orbits without using onboard fuel. A NASA/Marshall project, named "ProSEDS," is slated to demonstrate braking, by accelerating an expended rocket toward re-entry.